Robustness in Learning and Statistics: Past and Future

August 12-15, 2019
UC San Diego
http://cseweb.ucsd.edu/~slovett/workshops/robust-statistics-2019/

Registration deadline: July 31, 2019

Robust statistics and related topics offer ways to stress test estimators to the assumptions they are making. It offers insights into what makes some estimators behave well in the face of model misspecification, while others do not. In this summer school, we will revisit classic topics in robust statistics from an algorithmic perspective. We will cover recent progress on provably robust and computationally efficient parameter estimation in high-dimensions. We will compare this to other popular models, like agnostic learning and outlier detection. With the foundations in hand, we will explore modern topics like federated learning, semi-random models and connections to decision theory where being robust is formulated in alternative ways. We hope to have time for discussion about open questions like adversarial examples in deep learning, and invite the audience to help us muse about the right definitions to adopt in the first place.

3rd School on Foundations of Programming and Software Systems

September 10-15, 2019
Warsaw, Poland
https://www.mimuw.edu.pl/~fopss19/

The Summer School on Foundations of Programming and Software Systems (FoPSS) was jointly created by EATCS, ETAPS, ACM SIGLOG and ACM SIGPLAN. It was first organised in 2017. The goal is to introduce the participants to various aspects of computation theory and programming languages. The school, spread over a single week, is aimed at students and researchers in Theoretical Computer Science, broadly construed. Each year the school is focused on a particular, actively researched topic.

Our focus in 2019 are Nominal Techniques in Computer Science. For the introduction and cornerstone contributions to this area Murdoch J. Gabbay and Andrew M. Pitts received the 2019 Alonzo Church Award. Both of them are among the lecturers of FoPSS 2019.

3rd Symposium on Simplicity in Algorithms

January 6-7, 2020
Salt Lake City, UT
https://www.siam.org/Conferences/CM/Conference/sosa20

Submission deadline: August 9, 2019

Symposium on Simplicity in Algorithms is a new conference in theoretical computer science dedicated to advancing algorithms research by promoting simplicity and elegance in the design and analysis of algorithms. The benefits of simplicity are manifold: simpler algorithms manifest a better understanding of the problem at hand; they are more likely to be implemented and trusted by practitioners; they are more easily taught and are more likely to be included in algorithms textbooks; and they attract a broader set of researchers to difficult algorithmic problems. Co-located with SODA 2020.

Paper registration: August 9; Submission deadline: August 16.

5th Algorithmic and Enumerative Combinatorics Summer School 2019

July 29 – August 2, 2019
Linz, Austria
https://www3.risc.jku.at/conferences/aec2019/local.html

Registration deadline: June 16, 2019

The goal of this summer school is to put forward the interplay between the fields of Enumerative Combinatorics, Analytic
Combinatorics, and Algorithmics. This is a very active research area, which, aside from the three fields fueling each other
mutually, receives as well constant impetus from outside, by its interaction with algebra, probability, statistical physics, and computer science.

ADFOCS 2019 – Games, Brains, and Distributed Computing

August 19-23, 2019
Saarbr├╝cken, Germany
http://resources.mpi-inf.mpg.de/conferences/adfocs/

Registration deadline: July 19, 2019

ADFOCS is an international summer school held annually at the Max Planck Institute for Informatics (MPII). It is organized as part of the activities of the MPII, in particular the
International Max-Planck Research School (IMPRS), MPII’s graduate program. The purpose of this summer school is to introduce young researchers to topics that are the focus of current research in theoretical computer science. We bring together three leading researchers in the field with international participants at the graduate level and above. The focus of ADFOCS 2019 is
“Games, Brains, and Distributed Computing.”

Theory and Practice of Differential Privacy (part of CCS 2019)

November 11, 2019
London, UK
https://tpdp.cse.buffalo.edu/2019/

Submission deadline: June 21, 2019

The fifth annual workshop on the Theory and Practice of Differential Privacy will be held as a part of CCS 2019 on November 11. We seek contributions from different research areas of computer science and statistics. Authors are invited to submit a short abstract (4 pages maximum) of their work. Submissions will undergo a lightweight review process and will be judged on originality, relevance, interest and clarity. Submission should describe novel work or work that has already appeared elsewhere but that can stimulate the discussion between different communities at the workshop. Accepted abstracts will be presented at the workshop either as a talk or a poster. The workshop will not have formal proceedings and is not intended to preclude later publication at another venue. Selected papers from the workshop will be invited to submit a full version of their work for publication in a special issue of the Journal of Privacy and Confidentiality.

New York Area Theory Day (Spring 2019)

May 10, 2019
Columbia University
http://www.cs.columbia.edu/theory/s19-tday.html

The New York Area Theory Day, co-organized by Columbia, IBM, and NYU, is a semi-annual conference aiming to bring together researchers in the New York Metropolitan area. It usually features a few hour long talks on recent advances in theoretical computer science. The speakers this time are Sepehr Assadi, Tal Rabin, Omri Weinstein, and Mark Zhandry.